Fishing & Boating News

Piled Up - An Anglers Guide to Eliminating Rod Clutter

by: Blue Heron Communications,

Photo by Blue Heron Communications
Photo by Blue Heron Communications
(Jul 8, 2016 - Norman, OK) We all have them. Fishing rods are stacked not so neatly in a corner of the garage. They look intimidating, all mixed together with fishing line and treble hooks intertwined with rods, reels and just about anything that gets close.
 
I knocked one pile over the other day. Looked like a jumbo "pick up sticks" game played when I was a kid.

Anglers have always prided themselves on having an abundance of stuff. We like to have as many rods and reels as we can collect, even if many are totally unusable. Tackle boxes are never discarded and often never opened to see what lies inside. Spools of fishing line are still in the same out of the way hiding place, not moved in at least 10 years and totally unreliable being fragile along with a strong memory.

How many broken reels can one guy have? It's just the way of an angler.

Not all of this has a fix. We won't even clean out the plastic worms that are covered in dust, dry and with bleeding colors. Look close and there will be hooks and weights mingling with the worms.

But rods and reels have a chance. I gathered up my piles, separated into like types and segregating out the combinations I routinely use in my pond. Then I built my storage system.

My garage door has four panels, which was ideal for my plan. For each panel, I installed a Berkley Twist Lock Horizontal Rod Rack. The have an MSRP of $13.99 each. This Berkley rod rack holds four rods and reels with a twist lock design to keep the rods in place. I can raise my garage door without worry of the rods falling free. When the garage door is down I have easy access to my favorite rods and reels.

The added bonus is the reduction in broken rod tips.

It's a wonderful option for a more organized storage of tackle and I can easily store 12 combos. With a little planning even more rod racks will fit.
Photo by Blue Heron Communications
Photo by Blue Heron Communications